Arietta Cabernet Sauvignon Reviews

2016

Lavender, rose petal, mint, mocha and plum nuances abound in the 2016 Cabernet Sauvignon. A wine of total sophistication and polish, the 2016 speaks to balance above all else. This is a terrific example of both the year and the more refined style that characterizes the Arietta wines today. In 2016, the Cabernet Sauvignon was made exclusively from the Meteor vineyard in Coombsville. – Antonio Galloni (January 2018) 93-96 points

2015

Another gorgeous wine, the 2015 Cabernet Sauvignon (Napa Valley) is outrageously beautiful. Exotic and beguiling, the 2015 is a wine of total seduction. Blueberry jam, star anise, plum, sage, chocolate and cinnamon all develop in the glass. Like all of the Arietta 2015s, the Cabernet Sauvignon is all class. Silky tannins add to the wine’s sumptuous, racy feel. What a gorgeous wine this is. The 2015 was sourced entirely from the Meteor estate in Coombsville. – Antonio Galloni (January 2018) 96 points

2014

The 2014 Cabernet Sauvignon is a polished, elegant wine. Medium in body, the 2014 graces the palate with bright red stone fruit and floral nuances. The new oak still needs time to integrate, so I would give the 2014 at least another year or two in bottle. It will be interesting to see if the 2014 gains weight in bottle. Today, it is decidedly on the lighter side of things, even within the context of the vintage. – Antonio Galloni (May 2017) 91 points

2013

The 2013 Cabernet Sauvignon is dark and juicy from the very first taste. Sweet red cherry, plum, spice, new leather and rose petal meld together in the glass. Ripe, succulent and forward, this flashy Cabernet Sauvignon has enough softness in its contours to drink well with minimal cellaring, although it also clearly has enough depth and density to age well. The 2013 is a super-expressive Coombsville Cabernet from Arietta. – Antonio Galloni (October 2015) 95 points

2012

The 2012 Cabernet Sauvignon is fabulous. Gorgeous, expressive aromatics meld into dark red stone fruits in a Cabernet of pure breed and class. These cool sites in Coombsville yield a Cabernet built on savory aromatics, perfume and depth. There is so much going on in the glass that words prove superficial in trying to describe just how beautiful the 2012 is. Majestic. That might do it. – Antonio Galloni (December 2014) 96+ points

2011

Grilled herbs, mint, spices and tobacco notes are all woven together in the 2011 Cabernet Sauvignon. Delicate and savory throughout, the 2011 impresses for its layered personality and exceptional overall balance. The 2011 isn’t a blockbuster, rather it is a wine that stands out for its overall sense of harmony. – Antonio Galloni (November 2013) 92 points

2010

Arietta’s 2010 Cabernet Sauvignon bursts from the glass with juicy dark cherries, smoke, crushed flowers and melted road tar. Hints of mocha, espresso and plums develop later, adding a darker register that is highly appealing. Round, supple and totally enveloping, the 2010 should drink beautifully over the next decade, give or take. The 2010 is 100% Cabernet Sauvignon from the Meteor vineyard in Coombsville. – Antonio Galloni (December 2012) 94 points

2009

The 2009 Cabernet Sauvignon is silky, polished and totally refined. Today it comes across as quite young and in need of further bottle age for the aromatics to fully develop. It is a gorgeous, racy wine to drink over the next few years. The 2009 is 92% Cabernet Sauvignon, 6% Cabernet Franc and 2% Merlot, predominantly from Coombsville. Anticipated maturity: 2013-2019. – Antonio Galloni (December 2011) 92 points

2008

The 2008 Cabernet Sauvignon (80% Cabernet Sauvignon from a vineyards in Coombsville, 18% Cabernet Franc from the Hudson Vineyard, and the rest Petit Verdot from David Abreu’s Howell Mountain Vineyard) is a deep ruby/purple-colored wine with notes of minerality, boysenberry, mulberry, crushed rock, and foresty loamy soil notes. The wine is medium to full-bodied, tannic, and in need of 2-3 years of cellaring. Aged in 100% new French oak, the oak is still evident, but the fruit and concentration are more than sufficient to balance it out with another 3-4 years of bottle age. It should keep for 15-20 years. – Robert Parker (December 2010) 91 points

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